Category Archives: Uncategorized

Corinne Stevie’s “D.I.M” EP available now

Miami based emcee and artist Corinne Stevie dropped her latest musical project D.I.M today via her Tumblr. The seven track EP was written and recorded by Corinne Stevie and features a collage of spacey bassy beats provided by GREATeclectic, Urban Noize, BrotherIIBrother, Gotdion, Megatron UK and Grow. Take a listen to the EP below.

Primavera 2012 is perhaps the most rewarding, when it comes to festivals

Barcelona is one of those places that you never want to leave. The weather is perfect, the food incomparable, the atmosphere and attitude so genuine it will turn one chartreuse with envy. I have traveled abroad on many occasions—with friends and family—but never have I felt such a sense of welcome as I did during the elder days of May and the infant days of June that made up one of the greatest weeks of my entire life.

Barcelona is just how I imagined it would be: antiquated architecture juxtaposed beside modern design and 21st-century coolness. Our hostel, a towering steel mammoth that boasted such amenities as a picturesque terrace and ocean-view dorms, seemed at the same time fitting and yet somehow unfortunate, propped semi-gracefully against the notorious Sagrada Familia on one side, and the aptly-referred “Giant Dildo” on the other. Barcelona is an inexplicably cohesive city—in architecture and general attitude—as it seems to flawlessly blend relentless tradition with an intangible hunger for progress. The magnificent port city balances the two radically opposite ideals with astounding ease, thus causing an American tourist—like myself—to question the very reality of one’s experience within the city limits. Even now, a good month or so after my adventure into Barcelona, I still question the authenticity of my time there.

Barcelona boasts a certain gratitude to all that inhabit it, including citizens, visitors, and passers-through alike. Having visited many other European countries before Spain—including Italy, France, and the Netherlands—I was struck not only by the city’s beauty, but also by the level of easiness that its citizens seem to operate on so effortlessly. Coming from New Orleans, I am used to the easy-going way of life; it’s basically inherent to all those who live or visit here. It felt like a second home to me, except it was one that I never had visited yet I felt that I had arrived late for some reason.

 


I’ve been to my share of music festivals in my life. I fell in love with the concept when I traveled to Bonnaroo after my high school graduation, and since then I have either attended or frequented several other festivals: Coachella, SXSW, Ultra, Treasure Island…each festival offered their unique take on festival life and stood firmly behind their individual principles. The Primavera Sound festival in Barcelona was, without a doubt, one of the craziest experiences of my life. It was also perhaps the most rewarding, when it comes to festivals.

Bonnaroo has been my yearly excursion and trusty standby for the past seven years or so, it being the first festival I ever attended, and also they have yet to present a truly terrible lineup. I love being down on the farm (that’s what Bonnaroo regulars call Bonnaroo; it takes place on a 700-acre farm in Tennessee every June), but at Primavera I felt a certain kinship with the people around me and with my surroundings that I had never felt before in a festival environment.

At Bonnaroo, since the lineup is so varied, you always run into those people who are only there to see a certain act (i.e., back in 2008, Pearl Jam and Metallica headlined Bonnaroo, thus the farm was filled with frat assholes). Primavera had a completely different vibe to it. It may have been that there was an option to purchase single-day tickets to the event (thus ensuring a different crowd for each day), but for some reason Primavera seemed different. Perhaps it was the sheer variety that Primavera offered in terms of music, but nonetheless I felt—for the first time really—that we were all there for the same reason: the music.

Some festivals can get bogged down due to scheduling conflicts and those inevitable buttholes who come to see one or two bands and ruin it for everyone else by being totally wasted during those select shows, ruining the whole experience. Primavera never really allowed for that to happen, especially since there were about seven stages scattered across the gorgeous Parc del Forúm. The schedule was artfully designed that one could see virtually every band they wanted to, despite a few inevitable conflicts. For the most pat, however, I found that I had no real veritable dilemmas between artists I wanted to see, which is just plain miraculous when it comes to festivals that are this size.

Let me paint you a little picture. The festival site was a gorgeous architectural park that lay at the foot of Avenguida Diagonal—a fairly busy thoroughfare in Barcelona—adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea. The main stage boasts panoramic views of the surrounding shoreline, while the pivotal Ray-Ban stage offered sea views as a backdrop, viewable from several vantage points including a built-in amphitheater. At one end there was a giant solar panel—most likely powering the electricity for the entire venue—and at the other, a massive concrete lot that fed into the slightly smaller “other” main stage. Though it was a hike to get from one stage to another, conflicts were minimal and the whole experience was worth the slight overlap that occasionally occurred.

Unlike American festivals, which usually start the music around noon each day, Primavera—cohesive with the Spanish way of life—started much later, starting around six-o-clock in the evening and going till the wee hours of the following morning. During the sunset hours, chiller and more ambient groups would perform. Canada’s future-pop duo Purity Ring opened the festival for us, and was swiftly followed by Brooklyn art-pop group Friends and Philadelphia’s electronic virtuoso Grimes. During the twilight hours we also caught sets from Dirty Beaches and the incomparable Rufus Wainwright. Wainwright’s set mixed a delightful blend of old songs and new, set against an impressive Barcelona sunset over the sea.

Nighttime was when Primavera really came alive. During the early hours of night were sets from Britain’s The xx, Goth-pop mainstays The Cure (who played a 2.5 hour set, mind you), and Baltimore dream-pop gurus Beach House. Each night’s schedule was constructed beautifully to coexist with the later acts of the night. Beach House opened Saturday night’s festivities beautifully, mixing artful guitar and beautifully drippy vocals amongst tracks from the duo’s two most recent albums. Electronic acts such as Saint Etienne, Justice, M83, and LFO drew large, fanatic crowds and enveloped us in sweet, relentless sound that begged us to sway and groove to the merciless hooks each act selflessly provided.

“Electronic acts such as Saint Etienne, Justice, M83, and LFO drew large, fanatic crowds and enveloped us in sweet, relentless sound.”

Perhaps the most impressive aspect of the whole Primavera experience was that which the early morning DJs and electronic artists presented to us as a collective. DJ sets by Erol Alkan, Scuba, and Aeroplane were fantastically literate and impossibly smooth, and we danced as if we were slaves to the music. Perhaps the most impressive sets belonged to those electronic artists who were brave enough to play live sets that consisted of their own artistic vision. Highlights include the infectious dance beats of Neon Indian and the deafening bass of London import Benga, but perhaps the most astounding live set came from Barcelona’s own John Talabot. Seamlessly incorporating stylistic vocals, animal sounds, and transcending beats, Talabot had the gaping crowd virtually hypnotized, as we swayed almost uncontrollably to the dizzying complexity of sound he so effortlessly produced.

Many was there a morning when we left as the sun began to peek it’s eager head above the horizon of the eastern Mediterranean, and with a heavy heart we would drag our feet up the stairs of the amphitheatre, hoping to catch one of the eager yet surprisingly elusive cabs that would bring us back to our temporary home. Though each time we left, save for the last night, we knew that tomorrow would bring more joy, more uninhibited wonder, that we were likely to never experience again in our lives. Primavera simply translates to ‘spring’ in English. And although the weather was perfect, our spirits were higher than a kite, and our expectations either met or exceeded, it was not plainly “spring” to us. We were a part of another world. A world where we could dance until dawn, one where we could combat fatigue with determination, and we could experience what it really meant to truly love music. I’ve loved Bonnaroo for many years (I just attended my eighth), but nothing can compare to the sheer beauty and pure ecstasy that Primavera Sound has provided. I only hope I can afford to go back next year.

 

Unofficial Best of London’s LoveBox 2012 Festival – Sunday Set

Historically, music festivals like Woodstock and Glastonbury were created to celebrate idealism (one ‘ism that we agree is worth buying into). Lovebox is no different. Add to this idealism the inclusiveness that you find on the best dancefloors and the diversity you find on our capital’s streets and you have the beginnings of a manifesto for a world-class festival in a world-class city.

Ten years old Lovebox has grown up quickly to become the biggest party on East London’s summer calendar and with every year it takes another step forward.

Sunday is a freewheeling, groundbreaking, no-holds-barred party, pulling together elements of the fiercest all-night parties, ballrooms, gay discos, supper clubs, cabarets and bingo-halls and mixing it with recycled couture, the hottest emergent artists and, of course, outrageous acts to create a totally unique hedonistic all-dayer which is most definitely Out & Out Fierce…

Out and Out … and out, and out, and out #ofcontrol

 

LoveBox’s Sunday set maimed faces… the old-fashioned way – Le Freaks and Disco Beats, Khans and Firebombs, and Rhythmic Servitude in the name of Keeping Up with the Jones #Gracefaced

Chic ft. Nile Rodgers

Let’s Dance Cover

Like A VirginNotorius

Good Times

Chaka Khan (with Incognito)

Ain’t Nobody

Tell Me Something Good with Incognito

I’m Every Woman

Grace Jones

Slave to the Rhythm 

La Vie en Rose

Demolition Man

Feel Up

Unofficial Best of London’s LoveBox Festival 2012 – Saturday Set

Historically, music festivals like Woodstock and Glastonbury were created to celebrate idealism (one ‘ism that we agree is worth buying into). Lovebox is no different. Add to this idealism the inclusiveness that you find on the best dancefloors and the diversity you find on our capital’s streets and you have the beginnings of a manifesto for a world-class festival in a world-class city.

Ten years old Lovebox has grown up quickly to become the biggest party on East London’s summer calendar and with every year it takes another step forward.

Saturday follows the tried and tested Lovebox model of curating a heady mix of international megastars, pop-cult legends, hipper than thou rockers and underground club collectives. Heart and soul, rock and roll.

Unofficial… because the view from the crowd puts you right in the pit #orsomethingtothateffect

 

Stooshe, Sabre, Sande, and Kelis… Girl Pop that won’t give you cavities, rough-around-the-edges neo-soul crooner with a tinge of Legend tone on the tongue, the heavenly neuroscience student whose rhythm transcends the merely cerebral – and, of course, the acapella milkshake distributor #bawsey

 

Stooshe

 

Waterfalls Cover

 

Black Heart (Exclusive)

Maverick Sabre

I Can Never Be (Exclusive)

Emeli Sande

Heaven

Kelis

Millionaire

Milkshake (Holiday/Girls Just Wanna Have Fun Drum Mix)

…That need for speed, just won’t take heed

…That need for speed, just won’t take heed

 

WunderTwinz‘s music is an amalgamation of many styles and color palettes. All at once it’s dark moody-fueled indie-pop wrapped right with infectious, almost hip-hop, beats and bass drops. This concrete backdrop is knee deep in heavy themes of unrequited love, power trips and redemption. As visceral as it is vulnerable, their first release “CUMnGO” pulls together these elements perfectly and previews their upcoming debut EP (indulgent) delusions of grandeur (Due Sept 11).

 

…Just come and go, I don’t no more than that

WunderTwinz features NY based singer/songwriter Boreas Matthews on vocals and lyrics and Miami based artist GREATeclectic on the beats. Their debut EP entitled (indulgent) delusions of grandeur drops Sept 11.

 

WunderTwinz
(indulgent) delusions of grandeur

Sept 11, 2012

1. CUMnGO
2. Islands (the xx cover)
3. What In The World…?
4. Megalomania
5. Talkin’ (8-Course Shit)

Talk about inside wanting out…

 We called it then… We’ll call it now

Everything is cyclical. Take my journey in the arts. What started as an indoor activity, has now taken to the streets and right back indoors for the recent ART BOX pARTY at dooGallery in Atlanta, GA. Curated by Han Vance, the show gathered several Atlanta INtown newspaper boxes and asked some of  the hottest young artists (GREATeclectic, KingPOP, Linda Costa, Paper Frank & More) to give them a facelift. Talk about inside wanting out.

 

 

Life After Death: From Pushers to Papas, How Nas and Jay-Z Have Withstood the Fallen Genre

Welcome to Hip Hop in the year 2012 – a solemn vapor placed atop a slew of emerging artists. Deriving from context, Hip Hop is dead and has been for some time. It was conceived as an audacious gesture built off the blood of a cultural yearning. The people sought a voice. Given so, the culture moved, the people spoke, and the audible came to be the all-encompassing commonality. Plainly put, Hip Hop united the masses of once-opposed men. But naturally, as any progressive force increasing in widespread popularity, it morphed and took on a new shape. Hip Hop became a game and those of whom it comprised became its players. Today, in the year 2012, three decades and many men later, we reunite with the last ones standing to take a look at the archetypal evolution, or if I may, its life after death.

Continue reading Life After Death: From Pushers to Papas, How Nas and Jay-Z Have Withstood the Fallen Genre

This is the Story… of a Girl Named Sally TNGR

Alright, alright, alright – we’ve done this before… Well, not we, but me. So, don’t be scared – I’ve done this before. Gotta love album art, right? When it’s done right at least, which is the least you could ask from a generation of kids who make gifs and Photoshop tricks all day. Alas, today’s album art is… quite atrocious by-and-large. Anyhaps, when given the opportunity, I like to give stories to album covers – because a) why not (b) the picture itself already gave me the first thousand words, I’m just grabbing the baton (c) stop asking moot questions – the cover’s going to get creatively deconstructed. That said, Chester French is coming out with a new album #huzzah Yep, that Chester French #kanyeshrugsandsomeblackgirllove … connecting the dots… they dropped the album cover … connecting the dots … here goes the Blinkk:

Continue reading This is the Story… of a Girl Named Sally TNGR

New Standards: The Thin Line Between Those Who Appreciate Sounds And Those Who Understand Music

It’s often difficult to extrapolate on why we like certain kinds of music more than others. There seems to be an almost inexplicable link between ears, mind, and heart, in which we feel kinship with one artist or style and are totally turned off by others. Because a lot of us don’t know how the brain really works when it comes to music, and who really knows how appropriate our reactions to music are within the confines of physical science.

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Erasure Art: Who Will Remember Rihanna?

When painting a perfect picture, a painter must first have a blank canvas to illustrate their imagination on. A blank canvas has no meaning until the painter decides to add a bit of color to it and to make it into something people would delight about. This is what I think about Rihanna.

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For UNDA, Tomorrow Never Comes …Or Does It?

Atlanta producer and lyricist UNDA presents the aqueous album that is Tomorrow Never Comes. From the get-go, the six-track compilation plays proof of its condemned title. As the sole character, UNDA narrates the candid desires of his liquidated mind; under an intoxicated trance in his intro track “Dear Aquarius,” he spills out not-so-sweet nothings to an estranged someone. His words seem to seek this assumed lover’s echo while they tread through the prolonged thrashes of an electric guitar. The tone is set and this drunken tale is assumed to be damned.

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In A Square World, BOSCO Is Decidedly ▲

It was the brooding energy of a sweaty dark night in East Atlanta nightclub, The Basement. That particular night was like most other nights, in Atlanta, surely around the globe, in which local people with the spattering out-of-towners gather for one ever connecting force: live music. Of course live music does not guarantee good music or even a good time but it does ensure that the lack of inactivity will provide a backdrop for the rest of the evening. I’m here waiting for singer/songwriter BOSCO.

Continue reading In A Square World, BOSCO Is Decidedly ▲

A Delightful Reintroduction To Those Who Missed Santigold First Time Out

Musical chameleon Santigold (formerly Santogold) returns with a sophomore album Master Of My Make-Believe almost as eclectic as her eponymous debut was. Opening is the glitchy “GO!” with shades of M.I.A alternating between cheerleader-style chants and martial beats. “Disparate Youth” is Dubby with keys, strings and bursts of guitar. Continuing in the Dub vein are the haunting “God From The Machine” (interspersed with martial beays), the spare “Fame” with clunky/skittery beats, the skeletal snaking “Freak Like Me,” and the glitch “Pirate In The Water”.

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Eight Minute Epics Aside, Electric Guest’s “Mondo” Is One The Best Debuts Of This Year

Electric Guest are an LA duo comprising Asa Taccone (providing creamy androgynous vocals) and Mathew Compton. Their debut album Mondo is produced by producer du jour Brian “Danger Mouse” Burton and their airy incredibly catchy sound is reminiscent of MGMT or even Burton’s Broken Bells.

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With Achingly Slow Riffs That Ooze Forward Like An Oil Leak in Winter, Yogurt Smoothness Make Noises That Are Hard To Ignore


Orlando two man band, Yogurt Smoothness, are the sort of artists who are willing to take chances. Post-rock, noisy shoe-gaze funneled through sweat and life’s frustrations, and it comes out like this.

Continue reading With Achingly Slow Riffs That Ooze Forward Like An Oil Leak in Winter, Yogurt Smoothness Make Noises That Are Hard To Ignore

Milo Takes Baths…Really Lonely Ones

Meet Milo. He’s a rapper. Yet despite the title, I must warn you: Instead of thinking street, start thinking Star Wars. Immerse yourself in his interactive geek realm; slip deeper & slide further into the lonely bathtub that is Milo’s. Once you’ve entered, Hip Hop and its accompanying craft are perceived from the other side. Swimming into the deep end, submerge yourself in his overwhelming plethora of literary references and forlorn concentrations, flailing fantasies and latter losses. And when the tide gets high and the breeze sweeps you under, Milo’s somber song will sail you away…

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The School for Kids That Make Beats Good: Album Roundup

In a crowded electronic music scene it is easy to find different strokes for different folks. However, such an oversaturation of music can be a little daunting and hence a little exhausting to navigate. Sometimes all you need is an “in” into the sound and feel of an album before you invest your energy and time. Here at Art Nouveau, we have done that for you for some recent music we highly recommend. If you like the descriptions of any of these all you’ll need to do is jump in and enjoy. Make up your own mind.

Continue reading The School for Kids That Make Beats Good: Album Roundup